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Area work from the last two days from IL.

Friday 19th June

Happy Friday folks! It’s time for the weekly CLIC tests again. I was so impressed with the number of responses we had last week. It’s the same format as last week just with different questions. I’m hoping there are no problems but please do let me know if you encounter any issues. Have a go at the level you usually work on and if you’re very confident why not give the next one a go too? Remember to keep using TT Rockstars to practice your times tables.

CLIC 9        CLIC 10      CLIC 11         CLIC 12         CLIC 13

CLIC 14     CLIC 15       CLIC 16    CLIC 17       CLIC 18

CLIC 19

 

I’ve also added a link to a you tube video about the number 6174  - have a watch and give it a go – it was something I didn’t know but it really works! One of the reasons I love maths is because of these type of things!

6174 - Numberphile

Thursday 18th June

We are continuing to look at area today but we are moving on to looking at the area of compound shapes. These are shapes that are made up of more than one rectangle. The process is the same as yesterday, just that today you need to work out the area of more than one rectangle and add them together to get the total area. Watch my video (yes I held the phone the wrong way again…but if you listen very carefully, half way through you’ll hear Mr. Evans and Miss. Morecroft as they knocked on my door!) for some examples. Then, have a go at the tasks I have set. There are 3 different levels. The hardest level involves decimals so if you’re not confident with multiplying decimals then chose a level below. As usual, let me know how you get on using the google form below.

Google Form Feedback

Area of compound shapes

Wednesday 17th June

Hello Year 5s! It’s Mrs. Leverton back with you to finish the week off. We’re going to move on from perimeter this week and focus on finding the area of shapes. We’re going to start today by looking at finding the area of rectangles. Watch my video below (I’m sorry, I’ve got a new phone and held it the wrong way!) as a reminder of how we can do this. Then, select your level of challenge and have a go at the tasks I have set. There is a problem solving activity for you to try as well as an extension and there are many different solutions – see if you can find them all – think about working systematically! Let me know how you get on using the Google form below.

Google form feedback

I’ve also added a link to Bitesize as well as there is a good, simple interactive activity to have a go at – just click on ‘play’.

Area of rectangles

Some great perimeter work from IL -well done!

Time to see what we've learned over the last couple of weeks about angles and shapes - here are some 'reasoning and problem-solving' tasks for your to get your teeth into! You might find it useful to look at last week's teaching again to refresh your memory. Hope you enjoy it!

Monday 15th June 2020 Angles and lengths in shapes. A look at angles and parallel and perpendicular lines in quadrilaterals and triangles.

Angles in shapes

We've had a fabulous response to the CLIC tests this week - well done year 5s! Some of you have tried a few different levels and some of you have have kept trying the same level until you got full marks - great perseverance and we learn from our mistakes. Some of the wrong answers today were just due to formatting - sorry, I know this is annoying but basically, I have to try and guess the different ways you might type in your answers. When two answers are needed, for example, I will give answers that include one space between the numbers, a comma between the numbers, a comma and a space e.t.c. but it is impossible to guess all the ways you might input your answers! If you stick to separating your numbers with commas then this will definitely be a correct way of formatting. Hope that makes sense! Two topics that have come from the tests this week that people might need some more work on are Where's Mully and Coin Cards so we will make sure we focus on these in the coming weeks.

Wow! Load of great work sent in here from VS and JS! Great work!

Friday 12th June

Happy Friday folks! With it being Friday we thought we’d have another go at the weekly CLIC tests. We were impressed with the number of responses we had last week. It’s the same format as last week just with different questions so should be easy to navigate. I’ve spent a while making sure each form is set up correctly and I’ve even completed a google form myself for each clic level as a test so hopefully I’ve ironed out any problems from last week but please do let me know if you encounter any issues. Have a go at the level you usually work on and if you’re very confident why not give the next one a go too? Remember to keep using TT Rockstars to practice your times tables.

I’ve also added a perimeter problem solving activity for those of you who want more, more, more maths! The instructions are on the top of the sheet.

CLIC 9      CLIC 10      CLIC 11      CLIC 12      CLIC 13        CLIC 14

CLIC 15   CLIC 16       CLIC 17      CLIC 18      CLIC 19

Great work once again shared by EV, FS and XS (glad it would upload for you today!). Also good to hear from EL and RB on today's work. Seems like today was a little trickier for some of you but you're determined and stuck with it! I've been working with RW, AG and EM today in a key worker bubble and they also produced some fabulous work. Well done

Thursday 11th June

We are continuing with our work on perimeter today but we are moving on to calculating the perimeter of shapes using given measurements. Sometimes not all the measurements are given but you can always work out the missing measurements by using the information you have got. Watch my video for some examples of this. I’ve also attached a sheet of some worded problems for people what want to challenge themselves even more. Some are a bit tricky but are all based on what we have covered this week. I will work through an example in the video.

When you’ve watched the video, have a go at the tasks below then let me know how you get on using the google forms.

Google form questionnaire

Google form work upload

Calculating Perimeter

Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube.

WOW! I love the work that has been sent in today! One of my main hobbies is searching Right Move for houses and looking at the floor plans so to get two amazing house and room plans through from you has made my day! Great work EV and EM! I'm moving house in the next month (Sold our house and bought a new one all in the week before lockdown!) so I might call on you again for some help with room layouts. Well done to XS (sorry it wouldn't upload for you and the tape measure hurt you - 5 warnings tape measure) and EL for working with a tape measure too and to HH for measuring in steps! Fab stuff.

Wednesday 10th June

Hi Year 5s! It’s Mrs. Leverton back with you until the end of the week. We’re going to start a two-day focus on perimeter. Today is a practical task which involves you doing some of your own measuring around the house by measuring the perimeter of your rooms. I wonder which room will have the greatest perimeter and which will have the least? Watch the video to find out how I would like you to measure and present your work. Don’t worry if you don’t have a tape measure – I’ve given you an alternative in the video! The differentiation today is only in the ‘do me first’ as, how complicated you make the task is up to you as I will explain in the video. I have also attached a sheet for those of you who want to have some more practice at measuring perimeters.

Please let us know how you get one by completing the google forms.

Google form questionnaire

Google form work upload

Measuring Perimeter

Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube.

RWs brilliant maths work on angles.

Tuesday 9th June 2020

Moving on from lines, we're now looking at angles around a point - all 360 degrees of them!

Angles around a point

Monday 8th June 2020

Here we go with this week's maths learning - geometry and specifically angles on a straight line. Watch the video, read the teaching and have a go at the tasks! Please remember to try and share your work with us, if you can, using the Google Form. Have fun!

Angles on a straight line

Friday June 5th 2020

 

Well done for completing all of your tasks on converting units of measure. For your Friday lesson, I have converted all of the 'Beat That' CLIC tests into Google Forms.  

 

Please find your CLIC level, complete the test using the Google Form and then check it over with an adult in your house. Have fun! 

 

CLIC 9: https://forms.gle/HXaBCSQaSWzsx3nUA

 

CLIC 10: https://forms.gle/6deXSv86Bp1xxdrM9

 

CLIC 11: https://forms.gle/1khEGjBfr2FPdsncA

 

CLIC 12: https://forms.gle/mCdUQkZKqdHPMoyW7

 

CLIC 13: https://forms.gle/htr4GJudELGoLo937

 

CLIC 14: https://forms.gle/TDPQcSPzqf7iKqrb9

 

CLIC 15: https://forms.gle/gKCqWVXeRveG5g6h6

 

CLIC 16: https://forms.gle/kM5uzNwL8eEPxcy29

 

CLIC 17: https://forms.gle/qjpAkVyoTiXUCpdz7

 

CLIC 18: https://forms.gle/DtR6KrqhYN2DoNgz7

 

CLIC 19: https://forms.gle/1VyAMx2gv3oFuTBd8

Thank you so much to everyone who sent in work. I'm glad that everyone found the tasks challenging enough that it got your brains ticking, but not too difficult to make you give up. Keep sending in your responses!

Thursday 4th June 2020

 

LO: to solve problems using units of measure

 

I can remember to:

  • Use ‘milli-‘in units of length and mass
  • Explore capacity and length using jugs and rulers
  • To understand that milli- means 1/100 (one in every thousand)
  • Convert from metres to millimetres and vice versa
  • Convert from litres to millilitres and vice versa
  • To solve worded problems using units of measure

 

Key vocabulary:

Convert – change from one unit of measure to another

Divide

Multiply

Length

Capacity

milli-

millimetre (mm)  

metre (m)

millilitre (ml)

litre (l)

 

Today we are continuing with converting units of measure, focusing on the prefix ‘milli-‘ which means 1/1000.

Please use this really useful knowledge organiser to help you remember the conversions.

Y5 converting units of measure-Milli-part1

Use this video as an introduction to converting units of measure involving millimetres to metres and millilitres to litres

Converting units of measure-Milli- part2

Use this video to understand the types of tasks you are asked to complete in your activity

Now that you have watched the video, have a go exploring capacity. The weather is still nice enough to get some measuring jugs out in the garden and have fun measuring and converting amounts of water.

 

Use a ruler to measure different objects and check the measurement in millimetres, then converting to metres. Would it be a good idea to measure your height in millimetres?

Now have a go at these problem solving activities. Remember to use the place value chart to help you multiply and divide. Complete your remember tos using the google form and share your work, when you have finished.

Wednesday 3rd June 2020

 

Today we are continuing with converting units of measure, focusing on kilometres to metres to measure distance

 

LO: to use multiplication and division to convert units of measure

I can remember to:

convert from metres to kilometres by dividing by 1000

convert from kilometres to metres by multiplying by 1000

compare distances using < > =

solve problems by converting and comparing distances

 

key vocabulary:

convert – change from one unit of measure to another

divide

multiply

length

distance

kilometre (km)

metre (m)

 

Please use this really useful knowledge organiser to help you remember the conversions.

Y5 converting units of measure - distance

Now that you have watched the video, have a go at your activities. If you are in Cubes and Cuboids or Verne and De Gaulle please read on for a bit more help with your problem solving activity.

Ms. Solinger travelled the same distance on the bus as she did in the car

 

 

The clue tells you that Ms. Solinger travelled the same distance on the bus as she did in the car so if we focus on the first picture you can use this as a jumping off point.

 

 

8km divided equally between bus and car must be 4km each so we know that bus is 4km or 4000m and car is also 4km or 4000m. Use these facts to help you figure out the other modes of transport.

Tuesday 2nd June

 

LO: to apply a method to convert units of measure

 

I can remember to:

  • use a place value chart
  • work systematically
  • convert from grams to kilograms by dividing by 1000
  • convert from kilograms to grams by multiplying by 1000
  • show my working out

 

key vocabulary:

systematically – step by step

convert – change from one unit of measure to another

divide

multiply

mass

weight

kilogram (kg)

gram (g)

 

Today you will have further practice converting units of measure that are used to measure mass.

I have made the calculations more difficult today so make sure that you draw a place value chart and use it to work systematically through each conversion.

Please use this really useful knowledge organiser to help you remember the conversions.

Baking is a great way to understand the difference between grams and kilograms to use some of these conversions in a practical way. I have been baking with my daughter lots at home recently.

 

Here is a video of us having a go at converting and then measuring.

Y5 converting and baking

Some time later...

If you multiply 0.3 by 1000, you will move the digits three places to the left as the amount is becoming 1000 times greater as you multiply.

The 0.3 is now 300

When converting 0.14kg into grams, you need to move both digits three places to the left, starting with the 0.1 and then the 0.04.

This will then become 140g when multiplied. If you are dividing, the process is the same, however you move from left to right across the place value chart as the value is getting less.

After you have completed your converting activity, why not have a go at baking bread or a sweet treat. See if you can convert the recipe before you start. Here are some links to some recipes you might like to try.

 

Use the google form to send in any pictures of your baking creations and your conversions.

 

https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/healthy-banana-bread

 

https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/top-5-bread-recipes-for-kids

 

https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/collection/kids-baking

 

https://forms.gle/98n9DB8xbQpTtki47

Monday 1st June 2020

 

This week we are beginning a unit looking at converting units of measure. Units of measure are what we use to categorise the distance, mass or capacity of an amount.

 

LO: to use multiplication and division to convert units of measure

 

I can remember to:

  • convert from grams to kilograms by dividing by 1000
  • convert from kilograms to grams by multiplying by 1000
  • compare mass using < > =
  • solve problems by converting and comparing mass

 

key vocabulary:

convert – change from one unit of measure to another

divide

multiply

mass

weight

kilogram (kg)

gram (g)

 

 

 

Please use this really useful knowledge organiser to help you remember the conversions

I will be using a place value chart to help me with the calculations but if you are confident multiplying and diving by 1000 using an alternative method that is also fine. 

 

We will be focusing on kilometres to metres to measure distance. Watch the video to learn what you need to do today.

Y5 converting units of measure -mass

Some brilliant work on column multiplication and scaling from XS, EV and JS!

Here's a great selection of work from Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday this week, submitted by RW, EV, SA, MG, JS and our mystery pupil. The Google Forms for these tasks will stay open for a few days, so if you've not had a chance to share your work so far, there's still time! We love to see it.

Friday 22nd May

Happy Friday Year 5s and today marks the end of the half term so you’ve got a special Leverton family video for your maths today to mark the occasion! We’re still using the column multiplication method but we are working in a context today. The video will explain more and model the method once again for you. Watch the video below then have a go at the tasks I have set. The tasks are levelled but please feel free to change your level of challenge. The last level (cubes and cuboids, De Gaulle and Verne) have an extension task which other groups may wish to try at least some of. Please let me know how you get on using the google forms below. To make access easier there is one just to let me know how you got on and a separate one for uploading work to share. Enjoy year 5s!

** DISCLAIMER – ingredient quantities may have been altered to suit this task – if you wish to make any of the food items in today’s work then find a proper recipe! **

 

Google form - questionnaire

Google form - upload

scaling recipes Y5

Thanks for the feedback EL, MG, FS and XS and here are some super examples of work to share. I know you found Thursday's work a bit harder in general. I think Friday's will be easier.

Thursday 21st May

Hello! It’s Mrs Leverton back in the maths seat and have I got a treat for you! Yes, more column multiplication! We’re moving on to multiplying numbers with 3 digits by 2 digit numbers. The method doesn’t change from last week; we just have one extra digit to deal with so it isn’t actually any harder. Have a watch of the video below and the you will see how there is no difference at all. The remember tos will help you break down the steps involved. Then have a go at the tasks I have set. Once again, feel free to try a different level depending on your confidence in this area. I’ve set some challenges for you to move on to if you feel you have a really good grasp of the method. Please let me know how you get on using the google form below.

By the way - apologies for the muffled video to begin with - thought I was getting the hang of filming but I obviously had my hand over the microphone for the first minute - luckily I moved my hand so please bear with me past the first minute! Tomorrow's will be better ... if a little crazy!

 

Google form

 

Y5 3 x 2 column multiplication

Here we have some more great examples of your work on decimals and fractions from the last few days, from Edith, Josiah, Faisa, and a mystery Y5!

Wednesday 20th May 2020

Percentages as fractions and decimals.

Our last piece of work (for now...) exploring percentages, decimals and fractions. The instructions and tasks are attached below - make sure you read the instructions really carefully and refer back to them whilst you are completing the tasks. Hope you enjoy the challenges of the extension tasks! Don't forget to share your work if you can, using the enquiries@walkley email address or the Google Form.

More great maths work from SA and EV! We will move on with the method tomorrow looking at multiplying 2 by 3 digit numbers - no more tricky just bigger numbers.

Tuesday 19th May 2020

Understanding percentages.

Our first foray into simple percentages today; by the end of the session, we hope that you will understand that percentages are simply 'parts per hundred' or 'out of 100'. Tomorrow we'll look at decimals, fractions and percentages all together! We hope you enjoy the tasks and look forward to seeing your work shared via the Google Form.

Some more fab maths work from IL looking at using the column method to multiply 2 2-digit numbers.

Monday 18th May 2020

Comparing and ordering decimals and fractions

My decimal's bigger than your fraction - or is it? On Monday we're comparing and ordering decimals and fractions, before we move onto percentages on Tuesday and a recap on Wednesday to finish off this topic for this half term! I hope you enjoy having a go at the tasks and please share your work with us on the Google Form.

Thanks for the feedback! Some great work shared from the last couple of days from KB, EV, MG, FS and SA. Thank you! The feedback is generally that yesterday was easier than today. I will move on a little bit next week but we will take it in small steps and actually today is really as hard as it gets.Thanks to EL for your feedback too. Sorry to hear some of you are having trouble accessing the google forms - Mr. Murphy is looking in to it.

Great to have some feedback on the smile multiplication tasks from FS, SA, RW, XS and EL and thanks for sharing some of your work. It made my day to see 'fun' written by three different people - maths is fun!

Friday 15th May

Wow, it’s Friday again! It’s time to finish off the week with a bang – yes that’s right – time for some column multiplication fun, fun, fun!! We’re just dealing with two digits multiplied by two digits today and then we will progress further next week. Have a watch of the video below and try to follow each step – the remember tos will help you break down the steps involved. Then have a go at the tasks I have set – I have aimed these at certain groups but go with your confidence level and chose the one which best suits you for this topic – remember, we all have our own strengths in maths. I’ve set some challenges for you at the end but these come with a warning – they are tricky today!! I would really appreciate your feedback on this lesson before I plan for next week to make sure I get the pitch right – it’s so hard not seeing your books each day to make this judgement! Please use the google form below to show me how you’ve got on. Enjoy!

 

Google form

Column multiplication 2x2 digits

Thursday 14th May

It seems to have been a while since I’ve been in the maths corner but I’m pleased to be back with you. A couple of weeks ago, we were looking at column multiplication where we multiply by a single digit number. We will be moving this on to multiplying by a 2 digit number but I know this is one of the last lessons we had together as Varjak Paws, and one you found a little tricky, so I’m going to break it down first and spend a lesson reminding you about Smile Multiplication – a key step in the column method. Have a watch of the video below then have a go at the tasks I have set you. There is a mix here of fluency questions. If you find these OK, I’ve added some challenges as well. Once you’ve had a go, please leave me some feedback on how you’ve got on using the link to the google form.

 

Google form

Smile multiplication year 5

We've had some more pieces of work sent to share - Anza's timetable and Aaliyah's and Xanthe's thousandths. Thanks girls! Keep going!

Wednesday 13th May 2020

Rounding decimals - today we will spend a session on learning to round decimals (to a whole number and to a tenth). This follows very closely the rounding work that you will have done in previous years, so don't panic!

The instructions and tasks are below, and again there's a Google Form for you to share your work and make comments. Please stay in touch!

Tomorrow and Friday, Mrs. Leverton is taking over the helm and will be guiding you through some multiplication tasks. We've saved percentages for next week...

Edith has sent her work to share via the Google Form - thanks Edith!

Tuesday 12th May 2020

Understanding thousandths - we have talked about tenths and hundredths, so the next obvious step is to move on to thousandths (but no further at the moment!) Here are the teaching and tasks documents for you to get to grips with. There's also a Google Form to help you to engage with the teaching and learning. In the longer response box on the form, you can ask a brief question if you need to, or use the enquiries@walkley email address. Please also send us in PDFs or images of your finished work - we love to see them!

Faisa has also sent in her work to share via the Google Form today - thanks Faisa!

It's been great to hear feedback from XS, Suad, Reuben and Robbie today. Here's some examples of XS's and Robbie's Monday maths work. I hope everyone else is able to have a go - more to follow tomorrow! The Google Form for today will stay open for a few days longer so you can contribute your work.

Monday 11th May 2020

What an amazing response to last week's maths teaching and learning - great stuff, really well done!

This week, Monday to Wednesday, we're continuing to learn about decimals and fractions and will move on to percentages (high excitement!) Here's the guidance and tasks for Monday. There's also a Google Form to help you feed back to us. Please have a go - if you're unsure, leave a note on the Google Form or on the enquiries@walkley email address and we'll get back to you. Have fun!

Monday 11th May 2020 Decimals continued. Teaching.

Monday 11th May 2020 Decimals continued. Tasks.

Well done EV! Brilliant timetabling! It was tricky but you showed great perseverance!

Wednesday 6th May 2020

 

LO: to solve problems using timetables

I can remember to –

  • Read rows horizontally
  • Read columns vertically
  • Calculate hours from minutes
  • Use ‘it’s nothing new’ to help me multiply or divide
  • read and interpret the clues
  • fill in gaps on the time table

 

Timetables are used to find out when things are scheduled so that you can plan what you need to do, and when. Since there is not much need for bus or train timetables at the moment, I have focused our tasks on learning timetables. The vertical columns track the hour of the day and the horizontal columns track each day. 

 

This is the last day of our statistics recap so I thought that it might be fun for you to fill in your own 'lockdown learning timetables' using the clues provided. Follow the video for an explanation of what to do. ​​​​​

Y5 solving problems with timetables

Remember that for a lot of the clues, you need to convert from minutes to hours. Use what you have learned in CLIC, using 'It's Nothing New' to help you simplify the calculations. 

 

When you have finished your activity please use the Google form below to complete your remember tos and share your work.

https://forms.gle/e8ByHQhQ2JdRHdjj8

Brilliant responses from Esther, Edith, Xanthe, Henry and Anza! Well done!

Wednesday 6th May 2020

 

 

LO: to solve problems using two-way tables

I can remember to –

  • Identify both sets of data
  • Read rows horizontally
  • Read columns vertically
  • Calculate the total of a row or column
  • Fill in gaps on a two way table
  • Work systematically

 

Key vocabulary:

Horizontal - left to right

Vertical - up and down

Row - the horizontal information 

Column - the vertical information

Systematically - step by step

data - the information

total - values added together

 

Today you will be looking at two-way tables, that is tables that can be read vertically or horizontally to find out two different sets of information. Please watch the video to learn more. 

Y5 two-way tables

If you are in Cylinders or Pasteur, that video should have been enough to get you started on your tasks. All other groups, please watch the next video to learn how to find the missing values in partially completed two-way tables and some example True/False questions.

Y5 Two-Way Tables - how to fill in a partially completed table

Please now complete your activity:

Cylinders/ Pasteur - deep level

Pyramids and Spheres/ Curie and Descartes - deeper level

Cubes and Cuboids/ Verne and De Gaulle - deepest level

 

I have included the answers for your or a grown up to check after you have finished.

When you have finished your activity please use the Google form below to complete your remember tos and share your work.

https://forms.gle/RNUwGK4GvH1RP8Yw7

More amazing work from Esther, Robbie, Xanthe, Kaiden and Henry! Keep using the Google Forms and do send in your feedback. It's so wonderful to hear how you're getting on. It makes your teachers feel extremely proud of you!

Well done Anza, great work on Monday's line graph activity!

Tuesday 5th May 2020

 

LO: to read and interpret tables

I can remember to –

  • Know that a table is split into columns and rows
  • read the table carefully
  • read and interpret the question
  • know how to find the answer

 

Key vocab:

interpret - to explain to the information

greatest - the most or the largest amount

fewer -  the least or the smallest amount

combined - adding values together

compare - to find similarities and differences

column - the vertical section of a table

row - the horizontal section of a table

 

 

Tables help us to collect and organise information

In this example we can see how the table is used to find information about bird spotting. The examples given show us the most and the least but sometimes we need to find combined totals. For example, if we wanted to know how many birds Martin saw on Saturday, we would need to add the entire Saturday column (the vertical information). We can do this with a column addition. 
If we wanted to calculate how many birds he saw on both mornings, we could also find the total of both rows (horizontal information) combined.
We could also compare the information and find out how many more birds he saw on Saturday afternoon than on Saturday morning. You can find the difference using column addition or a number line. 

In the second part of your activity, you will be asked to copy and complete a table. Let's look at how to do this using a partially completed table.

if twice as many people chose custard pie as blueberry pie than blueberry pie must be 2 x 7, which equals 14, so the amount for blueberry pie is 14. 

 

14 is the greatest amount so it must be the most popular. To find the second most popular, you just need to look for the second greatest number, which is 11 so that must mean that Lime is added next to the value of 11. 

 

Finally, there is a completely blank row at the bottom, which must be where the data for cherry pie should be recorded. Cherry pie is three more than pumpkin pie and pumpkin pie is 5. Therefore, to find the total for cherry pie it is 5 + 3, which equals 8. 

Let's see if I was correct...

Now that you have read through the examples, try your own activities. Don't forget to use the remember tos as a guide and complete the 'google form' at the end of your activitiy

When you have finished your activity, please use the 'google form' below to complete your remember tos and share the work you have done. 

https://forms.gle/1vx1CCp3iLst1kXAA

Monday 4th May 2020

 

Happy Monday everyone! This week, we're going to do a review of Statistics, starting with reading and interpreting line graphs:

 

LO: to read and interpret line graphs

 

I can remember to - 

 

  • Draw my own line graph, using given information
  • Know what the question is asking
  • Count in multiples (y axis)
  • Find data on a line graph
  • Compare data
  • Find the difference between data points
  • write my own questions about the line graph

 

Key vocabulary - 

data - information read on a graph

increase - to get more or become a larger amount in value

decrease - to get less or become a lesser amount in value

compare - to measure the similarity and difference between data points

difference - the amount between two or more data points

 

 

 

Y5 KS Line Graphs

First use the video and the data provided to draw your own line graph, using the predicted temperatures for next week. Don't forget to label your axes and give your line graph a title. 

predicted temperatures

Now have a go at your activities. Please ask a parent or carer to help you try and complete the 'google form' when you have finished

Please send me some photos and let me know how you found the activity by sending me your feedback using the Google Form link below.

https://forms.gle/mwhzLBeuV9g2wfVS9

Wow XS! I'm really pleased to see you enjoying the game with Spiderman! I can see you've made your own dice too - great stuff!

Thanks for the feedback - I'm pleased to hear Xanthe has made her own place value counters - brilliant! Sounds like she's showing real perseverance too. Josiah has challenged himself to the harder level with great success. Keep up the fab work!

Friday 1st May

Wow, May is upon us already, how did that happen?!

Anyway, I thought we would have a break from calculation methods to have a go at one of my favourite games from my childhood. Yes, it’s Funtime Friday! We used to play this on caravan holidays and I remember winning a lot. Now, I’m usually beaten in games by my daughter Esme!

The game is called ‘Shut the Box’ but I have created my own version called ‘Splat’. I will show you how to play in the videos below but you need to do a bit of preparation first. It’s worth it, trust me, we’ve played lots since we made it. I have created two versions of the game – an easier version which you may want to play with younger family members and a harder version which is at a Year 5 level.

For the easier version, you will need:

  • two 1-6 dice - you can make these in you haven’t got any (see template below and my photos)
  • number cards 1 – 9
  • something to stick the number cards to – I used Lego people but cuddly toys would work or you could just turn the cards over but this wouldn’t be as much fun!
  • Some blue tack or sticky tape to attach the number cards.

For the harder version, you will need:

  • two 0.1-0.6 dice - you will need to make these. There is a template below but I don’t have a printer at home so I just drew my own net (3cm x 3cm squares)
  • number cards 0.1 – 0.9
  • something to stick the number cards to – I used Lego people but cuddly toys would work or you could just turn the cards over but this wouldn’t be as much fun!
  • Some blue tack or sticky tape to attach the number cards.

In both versions of the game, the winner is the person who gets the lowest score. You can play a game as just being one round or add up your scores from a set number of rounds e.g. 3 rounds. Oh, and if you manage to get all your numbers down in a round (or splatted!) then you have to shout out something – decide what this is before you play e.g. ‘mega splat’

Please send me some photos and let me know if you enjoy the game by sending me your feedback using the Google Form link below.

Google form

Y5: Shut the box Mrs Leverton style. Easy version.

Y5: Shut the box Mrs Leverton style. Harder version.

MASSIVE APOLOGIES VARJAK PAWS!!!

I uploaded both classes maths lessons last night but I've only just come back on to the blog having been in school today and it seems that the lesson didn't seem to have saved on our page. I owe you all some chocolate for that mistake when we return. I'll post both Wednesday and Thursday now...

Some maths work that has been shared. Thank you! And I'm pleased to hear Henry is finding it fairly easy - fab stuff!

Thursday 30th April

Thanks so much to those people who sent feedback via the Google Form – it’s great to know how you’re getting on with the tasks as obviously we can’t see how you’re doing like we can in class. Today we are going to move on to some problem solving. The method we will use is exactly the same as the method we used yesterday, you just have to work out what the problem is actually asking you to do. Watch my video below for a demonstration of this problem solving. Once you have watched it, have a go at solving the problems given in the tasks. There is an extra sheet of more challenging problems to have a go at if you manage to solve the ones I’ve set you.

Y5: column multiplication problems

Wednesday 29th April

Morning! Mrs. Leverton here. We’ve got two days of fun filled multiplication ahead of us and a maths game lined up for Friday. We’re going to look today at the use of column multiplication for multiplying by a single digit number. I’m using another lovely Amber video again today as she demonstrates exactly how we moved our methods forward in Year 5, from Year 4 grid method to using the column method. She mentions going back and watching her videos on the grid method but I don’t think you need to do that. Her explanation is very clear and uses place value counters just as we did in class. Have a watch then check out my screen shots below as a reminder, then have a go at the tasks. Tomorrow we will use the method to problem solve (I know some people requested more problem solving last week!) Use the Google Form link below to share feedback with us.

Grid method to column method multiplication (3-digit x 1-digit)

This video follows on from our last video, where we showed how to use place value counters to help children understand column method. We show how the grid me...

Click on the link below to leave us feedback. Thank you!

 

Google Form

Tuesday 28th April 2020

So, our journey into the world of decimal numbers continues as we consider equivalent decimals and fraction. Read the instructions text and then have a go at the tasks. We're looking forward to seeing your work!

Tuesday 28th April 2020 Decimals as fractions instructions

Tuesday 28th April 2020 decimals as fractions tasks

Some fab maths work from Anza and Iyes!

Monday 27th April 2020

Aaaaaaaand, it's a new week, so it's new maths! Monday and Tuesday, we're looking as decimals (a different way of looking at fractions of a whole). Have a read through the teaching and then have a go at the tasks. There are three different sets of tasks, depending on which maths group you're a part of, but the extension at the end is for everyone to have a go at. Good luck, and remember that you can always get in touch for further help, or to show us what you've done - it's always great to hear from you!

Monday 27th April 2020 decimals teaching

Monday 27th April 2020 decimals tasks

Great maths work from JS and XS today! The feedback is that today's work was a little harder but you'v met the challenge so well done!

Friday 24th April

I’m back for the last day of the week. I’m wondering how you mark the difference between weekdays and weekends at the moment? For my family we don’t do any home learning at the weekends, spend longer in our pyjamas, play more board games and garden when it’s nice weather. Anyway, in typical Mrs. Leverton style I’ve gone off task so back to the maths. We’re going to focus on chunking again today but we will find out what to do when a number doesn’t divide exactly by the divisor, or in chunking terms, we can’t take any more lots of the divisor away but there is still some left over. We record this as the remainder. Have a watch of today’s video and hopefully this will all become clear! Then have a go at the tasks I have set. There are a few problems to solve if you want to challenge yourself as well but think back to before the holidays when we looked at problem solving with remainders when thinking about the final answer (a re-watch of the video from 27.3.20 may help).

 

Chunking with remainders

Remember tos

Click on the link below to feed back to us on today's lesson.

Google Form

Maths Feedback

Wow! Thank you so much for your feedback on the maths. I've really enjoyed seeing what some of you have produced. It's tricky for us as, when we teach you in class, we can tell from your whiteboards (and often your faces!) if you're 'getting it' but we don't know in this new way of teaching - we're learning along with you really. Please do let us know if there are any problems - I love hearing the positives but negatives are really useful for us to and we can always make changes if things aren't working for you.

I've heard today how fantastically Esther is getting on with her maths and really getting to grips with chunking, Xanthe found the work entertaining and fun and it was all good for Ethan! 

Here is some of the work produced today.

Keep it up year 5s - we're all so proud of you.

 

Thursday 23rd April

Hi Year 5s! It’s Mrs. Leverton back with some maths teaching for the last two days of the week. Following on from our work on division before the holidays, we are going to progress to dividing by two digit numbers. For this, we need a different method which is the chunking method. I know you looked at this in Year 4 but I also know, from our work in CLIC this year, that it is the method that most of you have forgotten or find the trickiest. Hopefully today’s video and tasks will help you develop your use of this method. Have a watch of the video (You’ll see I’ve tried to replicate my class although they’re a bit quiet!) then have a go at the tasks I’ve set below.

Once you've had a go, we're trialling using Google Forms so you can let us know how you're getting on and share work with us. We will not do this with every piece of work but, so we can see how it works then please follow the link below to share your thoughts. Thanks Year 5s!

Google Form

Chunking Y5

Remember tos

EXTENSION ACTIVITY

Write a worded problem using one of the calculations below then ask an adult to solve it! Teach them how they could use the chunking method.

  1.  352 ÷ 16
  2.  713 ÷ 23

Wednesday 22nd April 2020

Today is 'Reasoning and Problem Solving' day, using your addition and subtraction skills. Read the information carefully and decide where the maths is!

Subtraction reasoning and problem solving

Tuesday 21st April 2020

As promised, here's the second exciting instalment of this week's maths - subtraction by decomposition (and that doesn't mean leaving it until it rots away!) Look and listen to the instructions in the video and then have a go at the calculations in the document. Tomorrow - problem solving...

If you have any questions, please get in touch on the enquiries@walkley email address and we'll help you out as soon as we can. 

Subtraction by decomposition

Monday 20th April 2020

Well, well, here we go with this week's maths learning - revising subtraction! In the document below, you will find a set of 'Varied Frequency' calculations for each group, as well as step by step instructions for subtraction using the column method. For today, there will be no need to 'steal/borrow/decompose' - we'll come on to that tomorrow! Then, on Wednesday, you'll be set some problem solving activities.

Hope it makes sense to you - if you have any questions, ask your grown up to contact us using the enquiries@walkley email address.

Monday 20th April 2020 subtraction

Friday 17th April

 

LO: to be able to find fractions of amounts

 

I can remember to: 

  • use a bar model to find fractions of amounts
  • use division to find fractions of amounts
  • work systematically (step by step)
  • show my working out

 

For our last lesson of fractions this week we are going to be looking at finding fractions of amounts, which means using numbers as the whole we are dividing into equal parts. 

 

watch the Maths is Fun video to learn more...

Fractions of amounts using the bar model

In this video we look at finding fractions of amounts for both unit and non-unit fractions. We use concrete resources and the bar model to help children 'see...

If you use the bar model to find fractions of amounts, you can see clearly what each part is worth

using the bar model you can see that one quarter of 20 is 5, 2/4 would be 5+5 or 5x2 so it would be 10, 3/4 of 20 would be 5+5+5 or 5x3 so it would be 15.

 

Try to use these bar models in your own working out.

Look at this example of working systematically through each problem, showing your working out.

Now have a go at your own problems. Choose the level you think is best for you. If you find this tricky, try the 1 star problems, if you are confident go for 2 stars and if you want a real challenge, go for 3 stars. Don't forget to use the remember tos!

Here is a bar model template that you can print, or you can draw your own.

Thursday 16th April

 

LO: to be able to find common denominators to compare and add fractions

 

I can remember to:

  • use a model to compare fractions
  • multiply one of the denominators to find a common denominator
  • multiply the numerator by the same amount
  • use the < > = symbols
  • add the numerators
  • use this method to solve worded problems

 

 

Key Vocabulary:

Fraction - an equal part of a whole

numerator - how many parts you have

denominator - how many equal parts the whole is divided into

common - the same

compare - to find the difference between two amounts

> greater

< less

= equal (same)

Today let's try the challenge of comparing and adding fractions that have different denominators. The way to do this is to find a common denominator.

We will use the same methods that we used to find equivalent fractions yesterday. You are finding equivalent fractions to make the two denominators the same. 

 

Let's try a problem:

 

Mrs Leverton walks for 3/4 of a mile on her lockdown walk and Mrs Goff walks for 5/8 of a mile for her daily exercise. 

 

Who walks the furthest? How far do they walk altogether?

 

This is a two step problem, you have to compare the fractions to find out who walked the furthest and then add them to calculate the total.

 

but first you have to find a common denominator

You can use a model to compare the fractions

In order to find common denominators, we need to convert the quarters into eighths so that we are using the same denominator. To need to find an equivalent fraction of 3/4 in eighths.

You can do this using a bar model

or multiplication

Now that you have found a common denominator, it is easy to compare or add the fractions. The problem would now be:

 

Mrs Leverton walks for 6/8 of a mile on her lockdown walk and Mrs Goff walks for 5/8 of a mile for her daily exercise. 

 

 

Who walks the furthest? How far do they walk altogether?

 

Remember that this is a two step problem so let's start by comparing the fractions to find out who walked the furthest:

remember the crocodile eats the greater (bigger) amount

We can see that 6/8 is greater than 5/8 so Mrs Leverton walked the furthest.

 

the second step is to add the two numerators to find out how far they walked altogether. You might need to convert from an improper fraction to a mixed number just like we did on Tuesday (scroll back to Tuesday's lesson if you have forgotten how to do this or use the fractions guide)

 

 

By adding the numerators, we found the total of 11/8, which is an improper fraction.

11/8 is one whole with 3/8 left over so it is 1 3/8.

 

Now have a go at your own activities. These are in three stages today, comparing, adding and finally some worded problems. Remember that the learning objective is to find common denominators so that should always be your first step. Use the remember tos as a guide and work systematically (step by step) through them. 

Wednesday 15th April 

 

Before we start comparing and adding fractions, we need to remember how to find equivalent fractions. Equivalent means that the value is the same, however, the denominator and numerator look different. 

 

LO: to find equivalent fractions

 

I can remember to - 

  • find equivalent fractions using models

  • use multiplication to find equivalent fractions

  • make sure that whatever I do to the numerator, I also do to the denominator

 

Key Vocabulary:

Fraction - an equal part of a whole

numerator - how many parts you have

denominator - how many equal parts the whole is divided into

equivalent - equal in value

 

 

 

Finding equivalent fractions just means that you need to have an understanding that as the denominator becomes greater in amount, the numerator also has to become greater. If you look at the picture of the pizza, you can see that 1/2 of the pizza is equal in size and amount to 2/4. 

1/2 is equivalent to 2/4

Let's look at how we can use bar models to show equivalent fractions. When we use a bar model, we must make sure that the whole model stays the same size. it is only the parts or fractions that the model is divided into that change. 

 

 

1/2 is equivalent to 2/4 on the bar models

If you look at the first example, you can see that the bar model or whole is the same size but the first example is split  into two equal parts, or halves, and the second is split into 4 equal parts or quarters. In order for the value to be the same, you need to shade more pieces of the second bar model, so 1/2 is equivalent to 2/4 as they are the same in size and value, but not the same numerator or denominator.  

1/2 is equivalent to 2/4 and 4/8 on the bar models

You can see from the second example that as I split my whole bar into eight equal pieces (eighths), I need to shade more to make the model equivalent. This means that both the numerator and denominator are changed to make my fractions equivalent. The numerator becomes 4 and the denominator becomes 8 because I have split it into eighths. I wonder if you're starting to see a pattern?

 

Let's look at how to find equivalents using multiplication...

using multiplication to find equivalent fractions

When using multiplication to find equivalent fractions, you must remember to multiply the numerator by the same amount as the denominator. In this example you can see that 1x2=2 and 2x2=4 so the equivalent fraction of 1/2 is 2/4

You can see that as we continue to split the whole into smaller pieces, we continue to multiply both the denominator and the numerator by 2, so 2x2=4 and 4x2=8 meaning that 2/4 is equivalent to 4/8

 

Using this pattern, what would 4/8 be if we split the whole into sixteen pieces (sixteenths)? 

what is the equivalent fraction in sixteenths?

You can also figure out the sixteenths from  halves or quarters just by looking for the connection or relationship between the denominators. 16 is eight times bigger than 2 so you need to multiply both the numerator and the denominator by 8. 

E.g. 1x8=8 and 2x8=16 so 1/2 is equivalent to 8/16.

Can you figure out how many sixteenths are equivalent to 2/4 using multiplication? 

Please now try the activity on your own. There is a choice of a worksheet or a board game (sorry but the board game does require a printer). Remember, the activities are set to the table that you usually sit on during maths lessons but if you are finding it too difficult or too easy, you can always try another sheet. The answers are included but please don't check them until you have finished. 

Tuesday 14th April 2020

 

Welcome back everybody! I hope you had a lovely Easter break and that you are making the best of our new normal. As you know, I love teaching you guys fractions so we have a week of recap on multiplying fractions, comparing and adding fractions and finally, finding fractions of amounts. I know that you will give it your best and make me proud! 

 

LO: to multiply fractions:

 

I can remember to

  • multiply the numerator
  • keep the denominator the same
  • convert improper fractions to mixed number fractions
  • write my own word problems

 

Key vocabulary:

Fraction - an equal part of a whole

numerator - how many parts you have

denominator - how many equal parts the whole is divided into

improper fraction - a fraction where the numerator is greater than the denominator

mixed number - a mix of whole number and fractions to show fractions that are greater than 1

 

Use this guide to help you remember all of the fractions vocabulary and operations that we have been learning in class

Welcome to the Fractions Pizza Party

Let's start off simple to get your brains back into fractions mode:

 

Duggee is having a pizza party (well he does have his pizza badge after all). He has invited myself and the Gruffalo and he cuts his pizza into four equal pieces. We each get one slice. How many pieces will he use? 

Remember that you are only multiplying the numerator because the pizzas are cut into quarters and that doesn't change, so the answer is 3/4, not 3/12. 

 

What about if Duggee gives us two slices each? 

Uh oh, Duggee is going to need more pizza! 

 

Don't forget that 6/4 is an improper fraction because the numerator is more than the denominator. 6/4 is 1 whole and 2/4 as a mixed number. 

 

If you are in Cubes, for that extra challenge, don't forget to simplify your fractions to the lowest possible denominator,using your knowledge of equivalent fractions. For example, 2/4 is equivalent to 1/2

Duggee buys more pizza but now Peppa and George have joined the party so Duggee decides to cut his pizza into eight equal slices, making eighths. He gives everyone 3 slices each. Does he have enough? 

 

 

He does have enough and he even has some left over for later!

Try this one on your own (don't forget to draw the pizzas or bar models, or just use your multiplication facts to help you):

 

Duggee cuts his pizza into six equal pieces (sixths) and gives himself and three other friends 3 slices each (so four people altogether). How many slices is that altogether? 

Don't forget to convert the improper fraction into a mixed number by thinking about how many whole pizzas he uses and how many left over slices he will need. 

 

Have a go before checking the answer underneath. Use the remember tos as a guide:

 

4 x 3/6 = 12/6 = 2 whole pizzas

 

Now that you've gone through my worded problems, can you have a go at writing and solving your own? Make sure that you use the remember tos to help you.

 

Why don't you have a real pizza party and invite whatever characters you can find at home (you can tell the age of my kids from my choice of characters), or even real family members. email any work that you have done or pictures of your pizza party to enquiries@walkley.sheffield.sch.uk

 

Finally, relax and enjoy The Pizza Badge with a younger sibling, or just by yourself because you're never really too old for Hey Duggee, A-Woof! 

Completed work - it's great to see the learning that's taking place at home - keep it up year 5!

Friday 27th March

Hi Year 5s. Welcome to your last maths lesson before the Easter holidays. Today we will be working once again on short division involving remainders. For a recap on division with remainders watch yesterday’s video. Today we will focus on the problem solving side of division with remainders to consolidate our fluency skills from yesterday.

After watching today’s video, follow the remember tos to solve the questions. You will have a few fluency questions first of all to practice your skills then we will move on to problem solving where you will need to think about what needs to happen with the remainder in order to fully answer the question. Tackle the questions aimed at your group. Any problems, email enquiries.

Enjoy and happy holidays! Keep checking the other areas of the blog as when we come across a good idea, a link to a good website or just something we think you will enjoy watching we will post this in the home learning and ‘other curriculum areas’ section. We will also share some of the work you send in to us – it’s great to see how you’re getting on with the tasks.

Stay home and stay safe.

Team Year 5

Short division problem solving

Problem solving tasks

Thursday 26th March

Hi Year 5s. Me again – Mrs. Leverton. Today we will be working on short division involving remainders. It’s just like yesterday really but when you divide you may end up with some left over. We record these are a remainder. Watch my video below for more information and a model for your work today. Hope you like my video and does my voice always sound that bad?! Sorry about my filming skills - I'll work on them for tomorrow!

After watching the video, follow the remember tos to solve the varied fluency questions. Tackle the questions aimed at your group. Any problems, email enquiries.

No problem solving today – that’s the focus of tomorrows lesson.

Enjoy!

Team Year 5

Division with remainders - dividing by a one digit number

Division with remainders lesson 1

Wednesday 25th March

Happy Wednesday Year 5s! Mrs Leverton here. Today we will be looking at the method of short division or 'bus stop' method as some people call it. For the Varjak Paws this is very recent learning so hopefully it is fresh in your minds. For the Skywalkers, this was a little longer ago so let's see what you can remember. 

Firstly, watch the video link below - it's the lovely Amber again! It's my turn tomorrow so you'll be hearing from me then!

Then, follow the remember tos -  I have taken photos so you can see each step (I wish I'd chosen a cleaner white board!)

There is a document under the photos with fluency questions for you to have a go at - choose the right level for your maths group. At the bottom are a couple of problems to have a go at solving. 

If you have any problems please ask an adult to contact us at the enquiries email. Enjoy year 5s and stay safe.

Team Year 5

.

Fluency and problem solving questions

Looking for the numbers in a worded problem

Solving addition problems

Home Learning - Numeracy, Tuesday 24th March 2020

Home learning; Numeracy for Monday 23rd March 2020

Please look at the video and then have a go at the tasks on the PDF. Remember we're here to help - contact us by email at enquiries@walkley.sheffield.sch.uk if you get really stuck.

 

Please let us know what you think about the video, as this will be the main way that we will be teaching whilst we are away from school.

Y5 addition Monday 23rd March

Addition instructions

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